The Birth of the World

The Sky Goddess loved the sun, from the moment she laid her eyes upon him. Swirling clouds of light and life, they danced and loved one another for time unimaginable. Their great courting led the sky goddess to become pregnant, growing great and round with the starseed of the new father-sun.
On the day that the sky goddess gave birth to the world, she looked down at a barren ball of dirt and water, and was enraged by the plainness of it. Sweeping her great claws of stardust across the umbilicus, she rent the world from her body with such force that the world’s naval tore and cracked, letting the remaining godsblood of the birthing fall through the wound to the center of the world. In her anger she seized the cord, tearing the afterbirth out of her body and casting it forth into the skies, there to hang for all time as the blood-red moon over the unwanted child-world.
With that, the sky-goddess left our world spinning round her paramour, leaving the father to look after his own misbegotten child. He took pity on our world, and bathed us in the same warmth and light that so drew the starry skin of the mother, and in that gentle warmth, the birthing waters and remnants of cord left upon our world settled to seas and rivers. The naval of the world, still wounded, sheltered the sparks of divine life left from the godsblood of birth, and from the naval came the first ones. Strong were they in body, and no more than infants in purpose, for they struggled to make their way and spread across the bones of this newly birthed world.
The father-sun looked upon them, and saw more of his lover than he could bear to see, and turned his eye from the world, searching the skies for his paramour. When he cannot find her in the skies, he again looks upon the world to remind himself of her appearance, studying the life that he begot to remember she with whom it was begotten.

The Birth of the World

Maranam, the City of Eternal Rest schyzm schyzm